Oh My Gac

"I'm quite aware of how ridiculous I am." - Albert, The Birdcage.

Food, Love, Writing and New York City - life as I feel it. Thanks for reading! ohmygac@gmail.com

Just brought at 70 lb. media center up from the lobby while wearing a pencil skirt. Hilarity ensued.

expect good things, accept good things.  

my mantra for today and really for life in general.

Yesss.
mindblowingscience:

Lucy Film Hinges on Brain Capacity Myth

On July 25, French film writer/director Luc Besson’s action thriller Lucy opens in theaters nationwide. The premise is that the title character, played by Scarlett Johansson, is exposed to a drug that unlocks her mind, giving her superhuman powers of cognition.  The movie production notes [PDF] elaborate:
“…It has long been hypothesized that human beings only use a small percentage of our cerebral capacity at any given time. For centuries, speculative science has postulated what would occur if mankind could actually evolve past that limit. Indeed, what would happen to our consciousness and newfound abilities if every region of the brain was concurrently active? If each one of the 86 billion densely packed neurons in a human brain fired at once, could that person become, in fact, superhuman?”


The notion that we humans have massive reserves of gray matter just sitting there waiting to be summoned into service has obvious appeal, but there is no scientific evidence to support it. And what’s odd about Besson’s reliance on this myth is that, according to the production notes, he allegedly set out to make the storyline scientifically plausible:
“Although Besson believed that the idea of expanding one’s brain capacity made for tremendous action-thriller material, he was particularly intent on grounding—at least in part—Lucy in scientific fact.”
Apparently he missed or ignored the many scientists who would have surely informed him that the idea that we use only a small portion of our brain (10 percent, the story usually goes) is wrong. As Barry L. Beyerstein of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver explained in a piece forScientific American:
“…the brain, like all our other organs, has been shaped by natural selection. Brain tissue is metabolically expensive both to grow and to run, and it strains credulity to think that evolution would have permitted squandering of resources on a scale necessary to build and maintain such a massively underutilized organ. Moreover, doubts are fueled by ample evidence from clinical neurology. Losing far less than 90 percent of the brain to accident or disease has catastrophic consequences. What is more, observing the effects of head injury reveals that there does not seem to be any area of the brain that can be destroyed by strokes, head trauma, or other manner, without leaving the patient with some kind of functional deficit. Likewise, electrical stimulation of points in the brain during neurosurgery has failed so far to uncover any dormant areas where no percept, emotion or movement is elicited by applying these tiny currents….”
Neither do we regularly use only a little bit of the brain at a time, as science writer Robynne Boyd reported in a piece for Scientific American. She quoted neurologist Barry Gordon of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine:
“”It turns out though, that we use virtually every part of the brain, and that [most of] the brain is active almost all the time,” Gordon adds. “Let’s put it this way: the brain represents three percent of the body’s weight and uses 20 percent of the body’s energy.”
Yet just because we are already using our entire brain does not mean we can’t enhance its powers. Exercise and diet can boost cognitive performance. And some researchers think cognitive training can make people smarter.
As for cognitive-enhancing drugs, the few that are available, such as Ritalin and Provigil, are quite the opposite of the compound Lucy is exposed to in the film. Rather than stimulating all of the brain’s neurons to sense everything in one’s environment, these drugs work to help people zero in. The results are a mixed bag, however, as my colleague Gary Stix has observed:
“Most of today’s cognitive enhancers improve our ability to focus—but most benefits accrue to those with attention deficits. They allow the child with ADHD to learn the multiplication tables, but for those with average attention spans or better, these drugs can sometimes usher in comic mishaps.
Instead of cramming for the [Chinese Proficiency Test], as you might have intended, you are liable to get sidetracked into the most mundane of trivialities: you might get up from your textbooks for a drink of water and spend the next two days replacing the leaky plumbing in your kitchen sink. The focus of attention ‘sticks’ to whatever is in front of your face and a friend with a verbal crowbar has to pry you away.
About the Author: Kate Wong is an editor and writer at Scientific American covering paleontology, archaeology and life sciences. Follow on Twitter @katewong.




Yeah, meh Lucy.

mindblowingscience:

Lucy Film Hinges on Brain Capacity Myth

On July 25, French film writer/director Luc Besson’s action thriller Lucy opens in theaters nationwide. The premise is that the title character, played by Scarlett Johansson, is exposed to a drug that unlocks her mind, giving her superhuman powers of cognition.  The movie production notes [PDF] elaborate:

“…It has long been hypothesized that human beings only use a small percentage of our cerebral capacity at any given time. For centuries, speculative science has postulated what would occur if mankind could actually evolve past that limit. Indeed, what would happen to our consciousness and newfound abilities if every region of the brain was concurrently active? If each one of the 86 billion densely packed neurons in a human brain fired at once, could that person become, in fact, superhuman?”

The notion that we humans have massive reserves of gray matter just sitting there waiting to be summoned into service has obvious appeal, but there is no scientific evidence to support it. And what’s odd about Besson’s reliance on this myth is that, according to the production notes, he allegedly set out to make the storyline scientifically plausible:

“Although Besson believed that the idea of expanding one’s brain capacity made for tremendous action-thriller material, he was particularly intent on grounding—at least in part—Lucy in scientific fact.”

Apparently he missed or ignored the many scientists who would have surely informed him that the idea that we use only a small portion of our brain (10 percent, the story usually goes) is wrong. As Barry L. Beyerstein of the Brain Behavior Laboratory at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver explained in a piece forScientific American:

“…the brain, like all our other organs, has been shaped by natural selection. Brain tissue is metabolically expensive both to grow and to run, and it strains credulity to think that evolution would have permitted squandering of resources on a scale necessary to build and maintain such a massively underutilized organ. Moreover, doubts are fueled by ample evidence from clinical neurology. Losing far less than 90 percent of the brain to accident or disease has catastrophic consequences. What is more, observing the effects of head injury reveals that there does not seem to be any area of the brain that can be destroyed by strokes, head trauma, or other manner, without leaving the patient with some kind of functional deficit. Likewise, electrical stimulation of points in the brain during neurosurgery has failed so far to uncover any dormant areas where no percept, emotion or movement is elicited by applying these tiny currents….”

Neither do we regularly use only a little bit of the brain at a time, as science writer Robynne Boyd reported in a piece for Scientific American. She quoted neurologist Barry Gordon of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine:

“”It turns out though, that we use virtually every part of the brain, and that [most of] the brain is active almost all the time,” Gordon adds. “Let’s put it this way: the brain represents three percent of the body’s weight and uses 20 percent of the body’s energy.”

Yet just because we are already using our entire brain does not mean we can’t enhance its powers. Exercise and diet can boost cognitive performance. And some researchers think cognitive training can make people smarter.

As for cognitive-enhancing drugs, the few that are available, such as Ritalin and Provigil, are quite the opposite of the compound Lucy is exposed to in the film. Rather than stimulating all of the brain’s neurons to sense everything in one’s environment, these drugs work to help people zero in. The results are a mixed bag, however, as my colleague Gary Stix has observed:

“Most of today’s cognitive enhancers improve our ability to focus—but most benefits accrue to those with attention deficits. They allow the child with ADHD to learn the multiplication tables, but for those with average attention spans or better, these drugs can sometimes usher in comic mishaps.

Instead of cramming for the [Chinese Proficiency Test], as you might have intended, you are liable to get sidetracked into the most mundane of trivialities: you might get up from your textbooks for a drink of water and spend the next two days replacing the leaky plumbing in your kitchen sink. The focus of attention ‘sticks’ to whatever is in front of your face and a friend with a verbal crowbar has to pry you away.

About the Author: Kate Wong is an editor and writer at Scientific American covering paleontology, archaeology and life sciences. Follow on Twitter @katewong.

Yeah, meh Lucy.

A couple years ago I heard a saying,
“If affections be unequal, let the more loving one be me.”

It’s not a popular thing to feel or say, especially in this world of players and games and adult ADD. And we all have a huge sense of pride and self preservation.

But when I think of all the relationships I’ve been through, or how many guys have broken up with me, and not the other way around, I have to admit I feel very little regret. Sure, I spend a lot of time getting angry or upset thinking of how or who did me wrong.

But ultimately, I don’t know any other way to be, except completely giving of my entire heart, whether I like it or not. I’ve never had a doubt that I always give someone a real chance when it comes to love. And some of them, they haven’t been straight with me, they haven’t given me their all, they’re terrified, they’re insecure.

It’s all been fine, because I can walk away knowing that ultimately I was myself, and if that’s not something they fall in love with, then I didn’t want them anyway.

http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/5610917?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000063

I just kind of needed this.

“Be soft. Do not let the world make you hard. Do not let pain make you hate. Do not let the bitterness steal your sweetness. Take pride that even though the rest of the world may disagree, you still believe it to be a beautiful place.”

—   

Kurt Vonnegut (via thisisjustgreat)

Someone recently pulled me aside and told me sincerely that I seem sad as of late. That I’m not the same happy girl she used to know. That I don’t seem open to meeting someone. I wanted to react defensively but she’s right and I knew it. Though she’s someone who sees me maybe once a year, it caught me off guard and shook my foundation a bit, my ego, the part of me that tries to appear normal, secure, fine.

It’s true, I’ve had trouble getting over some failed relationships in the recent years. I’d given up on dating for a bit because I was too angry or hurt or scared to put myself out there again. I’ve cried about it a lot, written stories, continue writing stories, poems, filling journals. I’ve been told twice this year that I’m overweight, and I know. I know. There are lots of things to sort through, like why didn’t I value myself enough to be with guys that are right for me, why did I stay too long with ones that weren’t? Why haven’t I taken care of my health when I’m lucky enough to have the time to now? There are so many punishments I can lay down, but I’ve done them all, and clearly it’s not working.

I don’t need to be ashamed of who I am right now, I’m probably the only person who needs to be convinced of that and yet it seems to be a pretty fierce argument! This is so much easier said than done.

But it’s getting better and easier, be it slowly, but if I’ve learned anything, rushing life makes it all the more challenging for lessons to sink in. We keep repeating and fumbling till we get it right.  And then we’re sometimes still not sure.  It’s growing up, actually.

It was an unexpected intervention at a nightclub that night, but I guess it’s nice to know that people still care.

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via emejuan)

Leaving all my leftovers out on the counter, not sure what or who I will wake up to over there, but I’m willing to find out.

Got a virus last week, felt better Sunday morning, worked out Sunday afternoon, sore throat Tuesday night again.

And I’m still waiting on a new fridge.

That’s my day in Gac’s wompy womperville.

Hope you’re all feeling just fine.

comedycentral:

Find your happy place with a new Daily Show tonight!

Lol

(via think4yourself)